The Golden House

The Golden House

Book - 2017
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A modern American epic set against the panorama of contemporary politics and culture--a hurtling, page-turning mystery that is equal parts The Great Gatsby and The Bonfire of the Vanities

On the day of Barack Obama's inauguration, an enigmatic billionaire from foreign shores takes up residence in the architectural jewel of "the Gardens," a cloistered community in New York's Greenwich Village. The neighborhood is a bubble within a bubble, and the residents are immediately intrigued by the eccentric newcomer and his family. Along with his improbable name, untraceable accent, and unmistakable whiff of danger, Nero Golden has brought along his three adult sons: agoraphobic, alcoholic Petya, a brilliant recluse with a tortured mind; Apu, the flamboyant artist, sexually and spiritually omnivorous, famous on twenty blocks; and D, at twenty-two the baby of the family, harboring an explosive secret even from himself. There is no mother, no wife; at least not until Vasilisa, a sleek Russian expat, snags the septuagenarian Nero, becoming the queen to his king--a queen in want of an heir.

Our guide to the Goldens' world is their neighbor Ren#65533;, an ambitious young filmmaker. Researching a movie about the Goldens, he ingratiates himself into their household. Seduced by their mystique, he is inevitably implicated in their quarrels, their infidelities, and, indeed, their crimes. Meanwhile, like a bad joke, a certain comic-book villain embarks upon a crass presidential run that turns New York upside-down.

Set against the strange and exuberant backdrop of current American culture and politics, The Golden House also marks Salman Rushdie's triumphant and exciting return to realism. The result is a modern epic of love and terrorism, loss and reinvention--a powerful, timely story told with the daring and panache that make Salman Rushdie a force of light in our dark new age.

Advance praise for The Golden House

"Ambitious and rewarding . . . a distinctively rich epic of the immigrant experience in modern America, where no amount of money or self-abnegation can truly free a family from the sins of the past." -- Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"A ravishingly well-told, deeply knowledgeable, magnificently insightful, and righteously outraged epic which pos#65533;es timeless questions about the human condition. . . . As Rushdie's blazing tale surges toward its crescendo, life, as it always has, rises stubbornly from the ashes, as does love." -- Booklist (starred review)
Publisher: Random House Inc Sep 2017
ISBN: 9780399592805

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erinh729
Jul 17, 2017

Salman Rushdie's new book is a breath of fresh air after Two Years, Eight Months, and Twenty-Eight Nights. It is full to the brim with literary and cinematic references, not to mention cultural markers and political commentary from the last 8 years and today. Rene is a pretty unreliable narrator and often unlikable, which kept me on my toes. I'm still not sure what I think of the book, but it is definitely worth a read. In addition to providing a suspenseful, enticing drama, Rushdie offers his response to the events of the 2016 election. It was definitely enjoyable to return to the land of the real after his last few fantastical novels.

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